Working Hard? Or Hardly Working? Comedy Central And The American Recession

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Working Hard? Or Hardly Working?

Posted on June 11, 2012 |

Are you a workaholic? According to the latest research there is more than one kind. Typical workaholics are “pushed” to their work and may suffer from poorer relationships at home and at work, as well as heart attacks and other illnesses caused by stress. But the latest discovery is people who qualify as “engaged workaholics,” who are “pulled” to their work because they love to work. According to Danish researcher Wilmar Schaufeli, these engaged workaholics “work because work is fun.” They also suffer less burnout, and perhaps fewer health deficits, than the typical workaholics.

I raise this question because Comedy Central just broke out its third season of Workaholics, an addictive show about three continuously baked twentysomethings who work as telemarketers. The three office mates/house mates are not “aholics” when it comes to work, but they are addicted to just about everything else: weed, rap, booze, porn, shrooms, acid, and wizards. Seriously, they love wizards.

The buddies on Workaholics have the same names as the actors who play them, Blake (Anderson), Adam (DeVine) and Ders (Anders Holm). Their boss is a woman—a barracuda with a soft spot for the slackers, and the plots usually revolve around a wild party, sometimes taking place at the suburban tract house they share, and sometimes taking place at work, like the time they camped out in the office while tripping on mushrooms, or the time they brought drugs on a business trip and were able to close an important deal by plying their client with acid.

However poor the work ethic of the characters on Workaholics, their real life counterparts probably qualify as “engaged” workaholics. Blake and Adam met at Orange Coast College, a community college in Costa Mesa, and after they found Anders at The Improv they began uploading sketch comedy to the internet in their spare time. Before they made it big, Blake, the show’s front man, with a mop of orange ringlet curls and a caterpillar mustache, was simultaneously going to school, delivering pizza, and becoming an internet phenomenon.

Fortunately for the show’s 2.2 million viewers per episode, mostly men between the ages of 18-34, the comedy trio took off. A Comedy Central executive saw one of Mail Order Comedy webisodes and agreed to bankroll their pilot. Ironically, of course, Blake, Anders, and Adam hit it big making comedy from their own nerdy, druggy, loserish lives. Most Americans are not so lucky. Any real worker who came to work as drunk, hungover, and stoned as the boys on Workaholics would be terminated.

Season one of Workaholics debuted in 2011 and featured wacky workplace intrigue, peppered by drugs, a bitchy boss, indecent exposure, and potty humor galore. The hilarious pilot featured a sadistic work place drug tester who threatened to expose the merry band of bromancers for the druggies they were. In an action sequence inspired by the film Die Hard, Blake busted through the office’s ceiling tiles, crawled through the air ducts, and broke into the room containing the vials of urine waiting to be drug-tested.. Blake then contaminated the samples with his own stream. In the final scene, the bested drug tester fell for one of the boys’ favorite pranks, stooping down to pick up a rolled up dollar bill filled with dog poop.

You wouldn’t think that a comedy this juvenile would have much to say about real workers, but the employees of TelAmericorp can be devilishly wry in their commentary on the modern-day dead-end-job. Almost every episode involves a real life situation that workers face in the new recessionary economy, such as getting fired, being denied vacation time, being fired for striking, being denied a raise or  a promotion, losing health insurance, being evicted, and failing a drug test. While the resolutions to these conflicts are often wildly fantastic and hallucinatory, and would never resolve a similar situation in real life, the jokes in each episode have nearly as much bite as an episode of The Office, that short lived 1990s comedy, Working, starring Fred Savage, or the 1960s comedy I’m Dickens, He’s Fenster, which I reviewed last month.

During a memorable episode in the first season, for example, Blake, Adam, and Ders stumble across a group of strikers. “What are you on strike for?” The workers reply: “More pay, better hours, health insurance.” The boys are confused, but in a good way: “Now let me get this straight. You guys are standing outside, not working, and yelling? Strikes are awesome! Strikes are freaking cool!” Later in the episode the boys stage a strike of their own when their boss refuses to let them celebrate, as is their tradition, “half Christmas” in July.

Many television reviewers and interviewers have noticed that Workaholics echoes the current economy. MTV Geek observed that, “the show is…about these guys working these crappy jobs just so they can have enough money to party, and it’s all happening in the context of this pretty crappy economy.”

But is it possible that the recession is making some workers rethink the workaholic treadmill? American productivity, which has risen aggressively over the last decade, was down significantly last quarter. As the Associated Press reported, this could mean that “companies are struggling to squeeze more output from their workers.”

Tim Jackson, an Economics professor at the University of Surrey, took up this idea in a recent New York Times Op Ed, “Let’s be Less Productive.” He makes the radical suggestion that we try to loose ourselves from the vice grip of efficiency and productivity and revel in “slow work,” taking time to expand the professions that require craft and care for others—including hospital work, the arts, and education.

On Workaholics, the characters definitely revel in non-productivity, and they do care a lot for each other at the end of the day. As with most fraternities, theirs is built on fantasies of sexual exploitation, usually thwarted, of course, because they are wannabe players. Ultimately, their fraternity is closer to the old union brotherhood than you might think. Blunt in hand, they stick by each other, go on strike with each other, contaminate drug tests for each other, close business deals for each other, fight drug dealers, mean office mates, and cold-hearted ladies for each other. On Workaholics there is just enough brotherly love and slacker-class-consciousness to keep me coming back for more.

Kathy M. Newman

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Democracy Now Interviews Harry Belafonte On Art And Using The Platform You Have

“Sing Your Song”: Harry Belafonte on Art & Politics, Civil Rights & His Critique of President Obama

Play_belafonte

Interview on Democracy Now! by Amy Goodman. Legendary musician, actor, activist and humanitarian Harry Belafonte joins us for the hour to talk about his battle against racism, his mentor Paul Robeson, the power of music to push for political change, his close relationship with the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., and the U.S. role in Haiti. A new documentary chronicles his life, called Sing Your Song. The son of Jamaican immigrants, Belafonte grew up on the streets of Harlem and Jamaica. In the 1950s, he spearheaded the calypso craze and became the first artist in recording history with a million-selling album. He was also the first African-American musician to win an Emmy. Along with his rise to worldwide stardom, Belafonte became deeply involved in the civil rights movement. One of Dr. King’s closest confidants, he helped organize the March on Washington in 1963. “Going into the South of the United States, listening to the voices of rural black America, listening to the voices of those who sang out against the Ku Klux Klan and out against segregation, and women, who were the most oppressed of all, rising to the occasion to protest against their conditions, became the arena where my first songs were to emerge,” Belafonte tells Democracy Now! [Click here to view the broadcast or to read the transcript]

Telling the Truth about/in the Native Land

Telling the Truth about/in the Native Land

Reading through the labor press of 1943 and 1944 I found this item about censorship in Chicago.  The film was Native Land, originally produced between 1938 and 1942 (when it was

Martin Dies, chairman of the House Committee on Un-American Activities

released) as a response to the right wing “March of Time.”  The film features Paul Robeson as a narrator and mixes documentary footage as well as dramatic reenactments of, for example, KKK attacks and union defense against labor spies and thugs.  (Click here to find out more about the film and the plot and here.) The context was the predations of the precursor to the “Un-American Activities” investigations, the committee led by Texas member of the House of Representatives, Martin Dies.  The committee name was changed to its more well known appellation from the “Dies Committee” in 1946.    In 1938, the year that work on Native Land was begun (under the working title, later discarded, of Labor Spy), the Dies Committee subpoenaed Hallie Flanagan, head of the Federal Theater Project, to investigate its infiltration by communists.  Member of the committee Joe Starnes achieved notoriety by asking Flanagan if Christopher Marlowe was a member of the American Communist Party, and whether the playwright “Mr. Euripides” preached class warfare.  The environment in which Native Land was censored in Chicago also saw the labor press calling for the disbanding of the Dies Committee for its anti union activity.

from Federation News, Chicago Federation of Labor

Lifting the Veil: The Democratic Party As The Graveyard Of Social Movements

Lifting the Veil: Obama and the Failure of Capitalist Democracy

“Lifting the Veil is the long overdue film that powerfully, definitively, and finally exposes the deadly 21st century hypocrisy of U.S. internal and external policies, even as it imbues the viewer with a sense of urgency and an actualized hope to bring about real systemic change while there is yet time for humanity and this planet. See this film!”
-Larry Pinkney
Editorial Board Member & Columnist
The Black Commentator

Sub-headed “Barack Obama and the failure of capitalist democracy”, this film explores the historical role of the Democratic Party as the “graveyard of social movements”, the massive influence of corporate finance in elections, the absurd disparities of wealth in the United States, the continuity and escalation of neocon policies under Obama, the insufficiency of mere voting as a path to reform, and differing conceptions of democracy itself.

Original interview footage derives from Noam Chomsky, Michael Parenti, Michael Albert, John Stauber (PR Watch), Sharon Smith (Historian), William I. Robinson (Editor, Critical Globalization Studies), Morris Berman (Author, Dark Ages America), and famed black panther Larry Pinkney.

Non-original interviews/lectures include Michael Hudson, Paul Craig Roberts, Ted Rall, Richard Wolff, Glen Ford, Lewis Black, Glenn Greenwald, George Carlin, Gerald Cliente, Chris Hedges, John Pilger, Bernie Sanders, Sheldon Wollin and Martin Luther King.

Visit http://metanoia-films.org/compilations.php for more info.

There But For Fortune: The Film Bio of Phil Ochs Reviewed By Howard Romaine

SIXTIES SINGER-SONGWRITER-ORGANIZER PHIL OCHS BIO OPENS

By HOWARD ROMAINE, writer, http://www.thetennesseetribune.com/

Just days after its opening in Boston, DC, and other places, the new film biography of Phil
Ochs opened in NASHVILLE at the Belcourt Theatre. If one wants a good, brief biography of the
sixties, taught from the perspective of the ‘singer-songwriter,’ this is the movie. If one wants to see
the origins of the singer-songwriter ‘folk’ crowd before it moved out to places like Nashville, New Orleans, Boston, San Francisco and Macon, and Atlanta, Georgia, Austin, Texas, and Woodstock, New York, this is your movie.
If one is younger, and wants, from lack of personal knowledge,  a puzzled back look
at what all the musical and cultural excitement and horror of the sixties was about – from the perspective of the young and engaged – this is the one movie one should see, and have history classes see.

http://trailers.apple.com/trailers/independent/philochstherebutforfortune/

From the early photos, movies and songs about the election of President Kennedy and his idealistic energy to the spread of this spirit to “Negroes” demanding the vote, or a seat at the table, to images of the death of Medgar Evers, and Malcolm X,  to the dogs attacking demonstrators in Birmingham, one gets the perspective and the reactions of the young folk crowd in New York, and, in effect, literary commentary on those events which were, at least in my case, as a college student of the era, the ‘facts’ as well as the ‘feelings’ about the facts which only songs, and songs from a certain milieu, in this case, Greenwich Village, and the urban sophisticated ‘south’ of ‘the movement,’ and the folk and coffee houses there, could provide.

Omission – the black presence and creative factor

Unfortunately, for me, the movie fails to provide much of the ‘black song’ which also arose from and enveloped these events – songs by Nashville and New York’s Julius Lester, or Cordell Reagon, or LA’s Lynn Chandler, or Albany and Atlanta’s Bernice Johnson Reagon, who met and married Nashville’s Cordell in the SNCC’s ‘Freedom Singers,’ and continued to  create, throughout her career, the musical soundtrack to the resistance to the racist repression of the sixties and ensuing years, rising to a high tide with Barry Goldwater, and his clone, Ronald Reagan.

After an early career with the SNCC Freedom Singers, and a move to DC for a Ph.D. at Howard in Musicology, Dr. Bernice Johnson Reagon’s created and sustained the acapella genius of Sweet Honey in the Rock, and helped Anne Romaine, here in Nashville, and thru the region,  sustain the folk cultural vision for years with events like the Grass Roots Days in Nashville, and concerts with artists around the country as diverse as John D. Loudermilk to Babe Stovall, and the Rev. Pearly Brown, Pete and Mike Seeger, Alice and Hazel, and Lynn Chandler,  and many other artists linked like chains of visionary poets to the principal events sadly and sharply depicted in this movie – from civil rights to Kennedy deaths, to Lyndon Johnson’s war in Vietnam, to its continuation by the two criminals Nixon and Spiro Agnew, shown here as they ascend; and the New York folk scene shifts from vocal opposition to active organizing – a role of Ochs which was new and revealing to me. It would have made a better, and more balanced,  movie to show the black origins of the music and organizing tradition of the era, as best reflected in Dr. Reagon’s long career.

However, many of the other leading lights of the era appear to give commentary, from Joan Baez, to Pete Seeger, to the record company executives of Electra, Ochs early publisher, to A & M, his publisher as he moved to Los Angeles in the second half of the sixties decade and to new alternative musical modes of creativity, to other musicians, friends, and relatives, sister, brother, daughter, whose appearance as a small child is one of the more moving black and white images in the middle part of the film, as her color commentary at the end, about  her father’s life and legacy, is sobering.

The extent of Ochs’ career, as a writer, as well as an activist, which continues with artists like Buono, of U2, is well captured with many later artist-activists, many of which I did not know. The early village scene with artists like Bob Dylan, and Baez, and the concurrent musical themes reacting to the events in the South is very well captured. And the size and diversity of his musical creations are given regular short shots throughout the movie, well paced between song, interview and visuals. Many of Ochs best known performances are available now on UTube, for example –

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=L5pgrKSwFJE

Although I had read of the competition between Ochs and Dylan, and it is briefly touched on in the movie, it is not a main theme, and indeed, their complimentary if competitive paths re-coalesce at an Ochs organized benefit after the CIA sponsored military takeover of the Allende democrats in Chile, in which the singer-songwriter, Victor Jara, was led into a stadium, filled with onlookers, and the singer’s fingers and hands were systematically smashed by rifle butts as a warning to the populace.

Ochs was sufficiently political and world traveled to have visited the Chilean singer just before the military coup, and organized a concert in Carnegie Hall to protest the vivid and viscious symbolic smashing of the songwriter’s hands by the Nixon-Kissinger-CIA backed military hunta.

According to the movie, the singer, Victor Jara, walked, his hands bleeding, toward the stands, and began to sing a patriotic song, and was joined by all in the stands, gradually, before he was shot down, murdered by the military.

Ochs and Village friends organized a Carnegie protest of this to bring it to world attention. The reconnection between Dylan and Ochs at this event is emphasized, rather than their sometime brutal competition, as footage of their joining together at the Carnegie Concert is shown, an event, again, which had slipped my ordinarily unrelenting Dylan history memory.

One could continue, as some reviews do, with reflections on Ochs ‘manic-depression’ and growing alcoholism, or marvel at his various incarnations – as an Elvis interpreter, in self-ironic jest – as a co-hort of the ‘yippies’ Ruben and Abbie Hoffman, (another alleged ‘manic depressive’ and drug abuser), or speculate about the lack of support of friends and family as he descended into ‘madness’ which various scenes toward the end capture – but, to me, this tragic aspect of his life is not the centerpiece.

No, that’s the beautiful voice, the tunes seemingly unending from his guitar, his laugh and joy in creation and opposition, and the contrast between a beautiful, if defeated creative life, and various evil, misguided, and murderous policies he dedicated his life and art to opposing.

Go see the movie for yourself. Or read the reviews, then go see it.

http://www.beyondchron.org/articbeles/Film_Review_Phil_Ochs_There_But_For_Fortune__8994.html

It plays two or three more days at the Belcourt. It’s the best movie I’ve ever seen about the sixties, but then, again, I see the era from the vantage point of its early literature – the song!! And, I know tragedy and literary triumph interconnect like earth, rain and spring.

The Apostate: A New Yorker Exposé Of The Church Of Scientology


The Apostate
Paul Haggis vs. the Church of Scientology.
by Lawrence Wright February 14, 2011

On August 19, 2009, Tommy Davis, the chief spokesperson for the Church of Scientology International, received a letter from the film director and screenwriter Paul Haggis. “For ten months now I have been writing to ask you to make a public statement denouncing the actions of the Church of Scientology of San Diego,” Haggis wrote. Before the 2008 elections, a staff member at Scientology’s San Diego church had signed its name to an online petition supporting Proposition 8, which asserted that the State of California should sanction marriage only “between a man and a woman.” The proposition passed. As Haggis saw it, the San Diego church’s “public sponsorship of Proposition 8, which succeeded in taking away the civil rights of gay and lesbian citizens of California—rights that were granted them by the Supreme Court of our state—is a stain on the integrity of our organization and a stain on us personally. Our public association with that hate-filled legislation shames us.” Haggis wrote, “Silence is consent, Tommy. I refuse to consent.” He concluded, “I hereby resign my membership in the Church of Scientology.”
Haggis was prominent in both Scientology and Hollywood, two communities that often converge. Although he is less famous than certain other Scientologists, such as Tom Cruise and John Travolta, he had been in the organization for nearly thirty-five years. Haggis wrote the screenplay for “Million Dollar Baby,”. . . Click here to read more[

[The New Yorker article is huge;  if you want a “Cliff’s Notes” version, try this “What You Need to Know” article. — LR]

Video Of/About Wisconsin Demonstrations Against Scott Walker

There is no order to these videos.  More will be added as people send them to me or as I glean them from the web. Most recent added are at bottom of each section (Video and Text)

Video Links

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vJOtUEORNkw&feature=player_embedded Solidarity video from Madison

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QZ5CqhL5X4o Todd Alan Price in Madison

http://www.youtube.com/user/tprice1963?email=share_video_user Todd Alan Price in Madison

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=p8SEo9NV-UA Young trade unionists in Maryland

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jdLcGW4LRQc&feature=player_embedded I am a teacher

http://www.readersupportednews.org/off-site-opinion-section/72-72/4988-qdemocracy-uprisingq-in-the-usa Noam Chomsky on Democracy Now

http://maddowblog.msnbc.msn.com/_news/2011/02/17/6075298-never-poke-a-badger-in-the-eye Rachel Maddow – Poke A Badger In The Eye

http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=CjcneEagoCE#at=75

http://therealnews.com/t2/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=31&Itemid=74&jumival=6291 TRNN: Class Struggle in Wisconsin. Paul Jay interviews AFL-CIO leader

http://vimeo.com/20110135 Cheesehead rally, NYC 2/18/2011

http://bit.ly/fr17Yc Impromptu b-boying in the rotunda
http://bit.ly/e3Ht3W State Senator Lena Taylor: Teachers are in the house!  2/15/2011
http://bit.ly/ebBF07 Firefighters at the capitol — bagpipers

http://www.facebook.com/home.php?#!/jobswithjustice Jobs With Justice site follows the activities closely with video, photo and text

http://vimeo.com/20089255 Matt Wisniewski’s excellent video beautifully captures the mood.  He sets up shots from the rallies of 2/15-2/17 to a background of Arcade Fire’s “Rebellion (Lies)”

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=N_-NlVCPYWs The ED show (NY) calls on Democrats to have backbone, support workers (interesting clip of Ted Kennedy)

http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/21134540/vp/41675756#41675330 The ED show from Madison Feb. 18 focuses on concessions made by workers, applauded by Democrats, and rejected by Scott Walker

http://therealnews.com/t2/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=31&Itemid=74&jumival=6299 Matt Rothschild (The Progressive Magazine) talks with TRNN about the history of progressivism in Wisconsin and the current battle)

http://www.facebook.com/video/video.php?v=10150104432416234 Posted by Michael Shallal, Cabbies support the Madison demonstrators

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lZsOKNfNkfQ Rep. Gordon Hintz chews out his colleagues for trying to force the “Repair Bill” through

http://vimeo.com/20168864 Matthew Wisnewski’s part 2, Feb. 18 and 19, set to “The Cave” by Mumford and Sons

http://www.youtube.com/user/cinderbelle319 Straightforward explanation about the situation surrounding the Wisconsin demos and the “Budget Repair Bill.” This is the first video by this 22 year old.  Hope to see a lot more

http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/21134540/vp/41674668#41674668 Rachel Maddow drops some valuable Wisconsin and workers history to put things into perspective (then goes into her analysis, that this is all intended to give Republicans local and then national dominance in electoral politics):

http://vimeo.com/20146715 Todd Alan Price interviews, along with Luciano on camera (about one hour)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0fCm6JcOMuM&feature=player_embedded Police officer testifies about the peaceful protests, Limbaugh and Fox News distortions

http://www.thenation.com/video/158811/students-and-workers-join-together-wisconsin Todd Alan Price for The Nation

http://therealnews.com/t2/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=31& TRNN examines how cutbacks in public services/public workers is a phony solution

http://therealnews.com/t2/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=31& Paul Jay (TRNN) proposes that Wisconsin’s billionaires should make some sacrifices too . . .

http://ednotesonline.blogspot.com/2011/02/wisconsin-ohio-indiana-new-york.html In this video from New York’s Ed Notes, Ed Schultz conducts interviews at a protest rally in front of Fox News HQ.  The video ends with a brillian satirical speech, imploring the crowd to pity the poor, suffering billionaires.

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2011/02/22/walker-unions-wisconsin-protests_n_826908.html?ref=fb&src=sp Whoops!  Cutting benefits may actually COST money . . .

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nHIyRFH5r-I&feature=email Substance News video of the Feb. 26 solidarity with Wisconsin demo.  Background: Utah Phillips sings Solidarity Forever

http://therealnews.com/t2/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=31&Itemid=74&jumival=6367 TRNN sums up the struggle after the rally March 5, 2011

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rG9I-oA_Er0&sns=fb Two Weeks In Madison, a tribute video which is very effective

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pjCEW2J30oM Wisconsin Senate passes anti-collective bargaining bill  March 9, 2011

Music

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kYiKdJoSsb8&feature=player_embedded Pete Seeger and a “Solidarity Forever” video montage

http://www.youtube.com/wethepeoplewisconsin#p/c/7471346814D51E57/24/zWCixXEe35g Tom Morello sings “World Wide Rebel Songs” and brings greetings from Cairo to Madison

http://www.youtube.com/wethepeoplewisconsin#p/c/24/zWCixXEe35g Tom Morello sings to a rally on the state Capitol

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nHIyRFH5r-I&feature=email Utah Phillips backs this video up with an especially sonorous Solidarity Forever

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=J0P4ZAyROfI Wayne Kramer is joined by Tom Morello and a bunch of others for jamming Kick Out The Jams

And Text and Non Video:

http://wisconsinwave.org/four-ways-build-wisconsin-wave-against-corporate-rule Wisconsin Wave

https://chilaborarts.wordpress.com/2011/02/16/the-aaup-comments-on-a-coordinated-attack-on-public-workers/ AAUP comments posted  on this blog

http://www.dispatchpolitics.com/live/content/local_news/stories/2011/02/10/copy/kasich-to-public-workers-you-strike-you-get-punished.html?adsec=politics&sid=101 Ohio threatens public workers

http://cwcs.ysu.edu/about/news/senate-bill-5-testimony Sherry Linkon & John Russo testimony re Ohio

http://www.progressive.org/wx021511.html Matt Rothschild on Wisconsin wars

http://www.truth-out.org/wisconsin-crowds-swell-30000-key-gop-legislators-waver67882 Truthout: Wisconsinites rally

http://www.buzzfeed.com/mjs538/the-best-protest-signs-at-the-wisconsin-capitol 45 Best signs at the Capitol

http://m.host.madison.com/mobile/news/opinion/editorial/article_61064e9a-27b0-5f28-b6d1-a57c8b2aaaf6.html Capital Times: Walker’s budget aids cronies

http://www.jsonline.com/blogs/news/116502958.html Walker rejects unions concessions

http://www.wlea.org/ Tracy Fuller, Exec. Director of the Wisconsin Law Enforcement Association regrets/repudiates endorsement of Scott Walker

http://www.thenation.com/blog/158741/aaron-rodgers-we-need-your-voice-wisconsins-working-families Dave Zirin calls on Green Bay Packer quarterback and shop steward, Aaron Rodgers to take a stand in Wisconsin

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2011/02/18/russ-feingold-wisconsin-protests_n_825325.html Russ Feingold rallies workers in Madison

http://www.alternet.org/newsandviews/article/480120 Wisconsin uprising spreads to Indiana and beyond

http://www.alternet.org/newsandviews/article/480123 Walker’s statement shows the bill is not intended to solve the “economic crisis in Wisconsin”

http://www.seiu721.org/2011/02/post-1.php SEIU Local 721:  All eyes are on Wisconsin

http://www.alternet.org/newsandviews/article/479560 12 things you need to know about the Wisconsin uprising (Alternet)

http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=550496537&v=wall#!/album. Brett Jelinek’s extraordinary photo album of the rally Saturday, Feb. 19

http://www.politico.com/news/stories/0211/49888.html From Cairo to Madison, Free Pizza!  Culinary solidarity in action

http://www.reuters.com/article/2011/02/20/ West Virginia public workers rally in support of Wisconsin workers and to win rights for themselves

http://labournet.de/internationales/usa/arbeitskampf.html This German source for news about labor in the US has a section on Wisconsin.  This blog is sourced there as well as other info.

http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424052748704900004576152362740149144.html? Michigan Governor Rick Snyder won’t pick fights with unions

http://www.rawstory.com/rs/2011/02/22/indiana-democrats-flee-state-to-protest-anti-union-bill/ Indiana Democrat legislators follow the lead of their Wisconsin colleagues

http://blog.aflcio.org/2011/02/23/breaking-news-from-indiana-right-to-work-withdrawn/ AFL-CIO reports that Indiana Republicans withdrew right=to=work legislation

http://www.rawstory.com/rs/2011/02/22/hundreds-rally-at-iowa-capitol-over-labor-laws/ Iowans rally to support Wisconsin demonstrations

http://www.nytimes.com/2011/02/23/us/23ohio.html?_r=1&nl=todaysheadlines&emc=tha24 NYT reports on battles in other states, catching Wisconsin fever

http://thinkprogress.org/2011/02/21/leader-egyptian-unions-wisconsin/ Egyptian unions support Wisconsin protesters

http://www.commondreams.org/view/2011/02/22-13 Rose Ann De Moro on refusing to make benefits concessions

http://chicago.indymedia.org/newswire/display/93540/index.php Garth Liebhaber’s photos in Madison highlight members of the Chicago Teachers Union

http://www.channel3000.com/news/26998145/detail.html Saturday, Feb 26 will be the last day demonstrators will be allowed to occupy the capitol building in Wisconsin — unless officials heed the advice of the police.

http://www.rollingstone.com/politics/news/ Tom Morello, Madison, Frostbite and Freedom

http://www.stltoday.com/news/state-and-regional/missouri/article Missouri considering “right to work”

http://blogs.forbes.com/rickungar/2011/02/25/ Taxpayers Contribute Nothing To Public Employee Pensions

http://bigozine2.com/feature/?p=548 Bill Glahn interviews Wayne Kramer of the MC5, archival story from The Big O with relevance for today

http://www.montevidayo.com/?p=1026The Poet Brenda Cardenas reports from the scene and reflects on personal and political history

https://www.facebook.com/notes/ This link is a restricted one and requires that you are “friends” with Lew Rosenbaum on facebook.   Nick Lampert, Aaron Hughes and Dan Wang appeal from Wisconsin.

http://news.firedoglake.com/2011/03/09/anti-public-employee-bill-passes-senate- Anti collective bargaining passed by Wisconsin Senate