Getting Organized in New Ways (in Tough Times)

Getting Organized!

New Strategies for Tough Times

A Panel Discussion

Gage Gallery

Roosevelt University

18 S. Michigan Ave.

Chicago

Friday, December 10

3-5pm

Refreshments will be served


With legal reforms for an improved organizing climate at a standstill, workers, activists, unions and lawyers are turning to new strategies to build worker power within existing workplace labor laws.  Creative and pioneering strategies crafted at Workers Centers have resulted in new ways for workers to demand their legal protections, often winning large back-pay awards. Advocates argue that in the long run, direct experience with the power of collective action develops savvy workplace leaders and lays the groundwork for a new wave of unionization.

Come hear organizers explain these new approaches and assess their potential:

Can these strategies expand the labor movement’s reach in the private sector where unions continue to weaken?

Can workers effectively represent themselves without formal union recognition?

Merely correctives for the worst workplace abuses or seeds of a powerful movement for workplace justice?

  • Kim Bobo, Executive Director of Interfaith Workers Justice and author of Wage Theft in America: Why Millions of Working Americans Are Not Getting Paid – And What We Can Do About It
  • Jose Oliva, National Policy Director of Restaurant Opportunities Center (ROC)
  • Lou Weeks, Organizing Director, UniteHere Local 1
  • Dr. Robert Bruno, Director, Labor Education, U. of Illinois

The mission of the Chicago Center for Working-Class Studies (CCWCS) is to bring together individuals from

multiple institutions to promote economic justice and to address class relationships. CCWCS is guided by

our commitment to strengthen the political, economic and moral power of working women and men,

and to expand understanding of how other identities intersect with class, including race, gender and sexuality.

 

For more information email Jack Metzgar at jmetzgar@roosevelt.edu

Co-sponsored by the Mansfield Institute for Social Justice & Transformation

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