For All The World To See: Visual Culture and the Struggle for Civil Rights curated by Maurice Berger

This New York exhibit looks extraordinary, and the promotional material itself is instructive.  Click here to view.  The cover photograph, from which the detail below comes, is credited to Ernest C. Withers (Sanitation Workers Assemble in Front of Clayborn Temple for a Solidarity March, Memphis, Tennessee, March 28, 1968 © Ernest C. Withers, Courtesy Panopticon Gallery, Boston, Massachusetts Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture

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For All the World to See: Visual Culture and the Struggle for Civil Rights explores the historic role of visual culture in shaping, influencing, and transforming the

For All The World To See: Catalog of the Exbhibit (Yale U. Press, paper, $39.95)

fight for racial equality and justice in the United States from the late 1940s to the mid 1970s. This exhibition of 230 photographs, objects and clips from television and film looks at the extent to which the rise of the modern civil rights movement paralleled the birth of television and the popularity of picture magazines and other forms of visual mass media.

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